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Creditcards.com

No-swipe credit cards could let thieves swipe your info Privacy advocates and consumer groups have recently expressed intense concern regarding the security of such credit cards’ underlying technology, known as radio frequency identification, or RFID. Even though the systems are designed to only allow a credit card to be read from very close, researchers have discovered that they can increase the distance.
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Popular Mechanics

RFID Credit Cards and Theft: Tech Clinic According to Fu, however, RFID cards do have a unique vulnerability. “Your card can be read surreptitiously. Unless you were paying attention to the guy behind you with a reader, you’d never know you were being skimmed.”
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Global News

Smartphone app that allows credit card skimming ‘real risk’ to consumers: experts A smartphone app, which allows the user to read credit card information through wallets and purses, is cause for concern amongst consumers that carry credit cards with radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, according to experts.
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digtriad.com

Millions At Risk Of Electronic Pickpocketing With RFID Technology An estimated 140 million credit card customers are at risk of electronic pick-pocketing. Cutting edge RFID technology is supposed to make it easier for you to pay. Law enforcement officials said it’s also making it easier for thieves to rip you off. “I don’t have to touch this card to get the information,” Placer County Sheriff’s Department Detective Jim Hudson said. “I don’t have to do anything other than walk by you.”
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cNET

RFID-enabled credit card theft There’s that old expression that waving money around only tempts thieves. Now, the multimillion-dollar RFID smart-card industry has made waving around your credit (and your credit history) that much easier for thieves to steal. New contactless credit cards, which use RFID technology, broadcast your credit information to credit card readers, so thieves, using equipment that costs less than $200, can now eavesdrop on the wireless transmission.
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Scientific American

How RFID Tags Could Be Used to Track Unsuspecting People A privacy activist argues that the devices pose new security risks to those who carry them, often unwittingly.
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Consumer Reports

Newer cards can be hijacked, too Check your wallet. You might not know it, but you could have a credit or debit card that uses a tiny computer chip and a radio antenna to transmit account information from your card—even when you’re not shopping.
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